Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

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Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby Ryan.carpediem » Sun May 17, 2009 3:43 pm

from t-nation. thought i should share some of the more pertinent points and see what the guys here have to say.
http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/a_question_of_nutrition vol 1

The technical formula for glycemic load is GI (glycemic index), multiplied by the number of grams of carbohydrates in the portion, then divided by 100. Low glycemic load is between 1 and 10, medium is between 10 and 20, and anything over 20 is very high.

That said, remember that both glycemic index and glycemic load only refer to the food eaten alone. Add some fat or protein and the total impact goes down. And plenty of high-glycemic foods are good for you (say, carrot juice) while plenty of low-glycemic foods (fried donut holes) are not.

So take glycemic load into account, but don't be a slave to it. It's just one measurement to consider when planning a diet.

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/a_question_of_nutrition_2 vol 2
Q: Most strength coaches agree that you need extra calories to build muscle. The question is, how much extra? On one side you have those who say to eat a few hundred calories per day over maintenance levels. Others say to just eat a ton and train hard. What do you think is best for the bodybuilding male?

A: "Train hard and eat a ton" sounds like a great philosophy ... if you're training to be a Sumo wrestler.I think it's way smarter to start with a controlled amount of extra calories and see if that's enough to do the trick. Ask yourself how you're performing, what your energy is like, and if you like the results in the mirror. If you're not coming up with positive answers, adjust the calories some more until you do.


http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/question_of_nutrition_vol_3 vol 3

Finally, remember that many fruits and vegetables contain carotenoids and other valuable phytochemicals, which are best absorbed with a little fat. So take some fish oil caps with your veggie and fruit juice, or throw in a squirt of Barlean's Organic Flax Oil. You'll never notice the taste, and you'll absorb the nutrition better.

Favorite combinations for me include:

Pear, celery, cucumber, ginger

Apple, spinach, carrot, ginger

Red pepper, apple, radishes, tomato, frozen cranberries

Mix, match, and experiment.


http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/question_of_nutrition_vol_4 vol 4
Q: What's the final word on tuna and mercury? Tuna is a bodybuilding staple, but I'm starting to worry that I eat too much.

A: Short answer: Don't worry about it.

I say that as someone who's as worried as anybody on earth about the toxic effects of mercury, not to mention the lackluster efforts of governments to control it. There's no doubt that it's in an awful lot of fish. Where it gets tricky is when we try to define the point at which it poses a real danger to our health.

That depends on a lot of factors. A pregnant woman and her developing fetus are far more vulnerable than the average bodybuilder. Many of the warnings about high-mercury fish were in fact targeted at that population (pregnant women, not bodybuilders).

Then there's the question of how you define a "safe" level. Many people think the government's standards are too lax. To them, it's as if we said "speeding" only applies to driving over 120 mph. If that's the standard, then all of us drive safely.

But let's look at it from the other direction. If you stop eating fish, there's a price you pay. Most experts think the cost of giving up fish, in terms of global health, far outweighs the possible problems caused by mercury in your system.

Two things you can do: One, consume a lot of selenium, which seems to have a chelating effect on mercury. Two, you can get your tuna from the same place I get mine: Vital Choice in Alaska. I don't have any ownership in this company, by the way. I just think they have the purest and best fish anywhere.

On balance, I think the benefits of cold-water fish like tuna and salmon, which are such amazing sources of protein and omega-3s, far exceed the possible danger. If you're pregnant, I might modify that advice, but not by much.

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/question_of_nutrition_vol_5 vol 5
For you trainers working with weight loss clients, I have a formula to suggest. There's absolutely no science to back this up, mind you, but it's been my experience that it works really well for most people: Take your current weight, divide by 2, and aim for that number of ounces a day. (I was happy to see recently that this is the same formula the great holistic doctor Deepak Choprah uses). For a 180-pound person, that would be 90 ounces a day.


Each 2-inch increase in waist circumference added about 17% increased risk for mortality in men and about 13% increased mortality in women. Earlier research showed that these same numbers — 40" waist for men, 35" waist for women — indicated an increased risk for stroke

You see, all body fat is not created equal. The fat stored around the butt hips and thighs — also known as subcutaneous fat since it's right below the skin — might drive you crazy and make your jeans fit badly, but it's not nearly as dangerous as the other kind. Belly fat, stored around the middle — also called VAT or visceral abdominal fat — is a metabolic nightmare.

It's stored deep inside the abdominal walls and is a metabolically active fat that directly increases the risk for all sorts of health problems, among them metabolic syndrome and diabetes.


http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/question_of_nutrition_vol_6 Vol 6
y opinion, the "fate" of saturated fat in the body depends completely on what else is eaten. If you're eating a high-carb diet, the effect of saturated fat may indeed be deleterious, but if you're eating a low-carb diet it's a whole other ballgame."If carbs are low, insulin is low and saturated fat is handled more efficiently," said Jeff Volek, PhD, RD and one of the major researchers in the area of diet comparisons. "When carbs are low, you're burning that saturated fat as fuel, and you're also making less of it."

So, eat way less carbohydrates and way less sugar, and it may not matter how much saturated fat you eat.
So what's the verdict? Though there may be certain cases where saturated fat could be a problem — i.e. those with the ApoE4 gene making them more susceptible to Alzheimer's seem to benefit from avoiding too much saturated fat — for most people a healthy diet of moderate calories that's low in sugar shouldn't have any problem with saturated fat from whole food sources.
Last edited by Ryan.carpediem on Sun May 17, 2009 3:52 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 7-8 by johnny bowden

Postby Ryan.carpediem » Sun May 17, 2009 3:48 pm

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/question_of_nutrition_vol_7 vol 7
n your book, The 150 Most Effective Ways to Boost Your Energy, you mentioned Lo Han, some type of sweetener. What's the scoop on this stuff? I've never heard of it!

A: Lo Han (not to be confused with the supremely self-involved actress) is the common name for a sweetener extracted from the Luo Han Guo plant found in the mountains of southern China. It's also known as Luo Han Guo and Luo Han Kuo.Lo Han has a vanishingly low glycemic impact, is way sweeter than sugar — about 250 times sweeter — and can be used with both hot and cold foods, so you can cook and bake with it or add it to coffee or tea.

If you want to try it, Jarrow Formulas makes a nice product called Lo Han Sweet. It has about two calories per serving (about half a teaspoon).


Q: Are there specific foods, or specific patterns of eating, that cause more fat to accumulate in the abdominal area? On a related note, does beer really cause a beer belly by preferentially storing fat there?

A: Are there foods that cause fat to accumulate on the belly? Yes: foods with too many calories and too much sugar.

Does that clear it up for you?

Okay, seriously, it's a good question and here's the answer: When you drive insulin levels up high as you do with high-sugar foods or high intakes of processed "CC's" (crappy carbs — it's a technical term), you increase the chances of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance nearly always goes hand-in-hand with a big fat belly.

In fact, the "low-tech" test for insulin resistance is this: If you walk towards a wall, does your belly hit the wall before you do? A guy with a waist over 40 inches and a woman with a waist over 35 inches nearly always have insulin resistance. You bring insulin resistance down with a low-carb diet.

Now obviously, it's not just sugar and carbs that make you fat, but they do send insulin — also known as the "fat storage hormone" — into overdrive.

You could eat 10,000 calories a day from coconut oil and you'd be fat as a horse, even though there aren't any any carbs in it. And you could conceivably be fat as a tub and carry most of that fat on your back or your thighs, hips, and butt. Still, if I were trying to avoid a spare tire around the middle, the first place I'd look to cut would be sugar and processed carbs.


As for beer bellies: Although a lot of beers don't have a ton of carbs, the belief is that beer may contain estrogenic compounds that cause the fat to accumulate on your body in a pattern that makes you look like Rosie O'Donnell — or Rosie Greer.

In any case, if you're putting away a six-pack every night, just from a calorie point of view it's going to create fat storage. Remember, they didn't start calling it "beer belly" because the term "steak belly" was already taken.


http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/question_of_nutrition_vol_8 vol 8
Q: As a nutritionist, do you think it's possible to gain muscle and lose fat simultaneously? If so, how would someone do it? The conventional wisdom says you have to add calories to build muscle, and then cut calories to drop fat.

A: According to my friend Charles Poliquin, the whole business of bulking and cutting is obsolete. Here's what he told me: "I can take a 200-pound guy with 20% body fat down to 6% in 8 weeks, with no change in body weight." That would represent a loss of 28 pounds in fat and a gain of 28 pounds in muscle.

You'd better believe there's a catch. He'd have to train twice a day, and this is how Poliquin describes the nutrition strategy: "I usually give them 2 grams of protein per pound of body weight per day, and the carbs come from 10 licks of a dried prune."

Not sure I'm totally in line with that recommendation, but who am I to argue with the master?


Q: You mentioned in Question of Nutrition Volume 5 that fruit is important for a guy who's trying to balance out an overly acidic diet — a diet with a lot of meat. Does that apply to a guy trying to lose weight? Will too much fruit lead to too much fat? Are some fruits better than others for fat loss?

A: Actually, you can balance out an acidic diet with vegetables or fruit, or a combination of both. Vegetables have fewer calories and a lower glycemic impact, so if that's a concern, load up with the green stuff.

You only have to worry about "too much" fruit if you have a real problem with insulin resistance or blood sugar, and even then the low-sugar fruits like berries, cherries, apples, and grapefruit should be just fine. In fact, one study at the Scripps Research Institute showed that eating half a grapefruit before a meal contributes (slightly) to weight loss.

I understand that at the moment you're only worried about fat loss and building a great body, but it's worth noting that a 26-year prospective study of men in Sweden showed that fruit intake in general is associated with greater longevity. (1)

Remember, no one ever got fat on apples. If you're trying to lose fat, it's not the fruits and veggies that you have to worry about.

Q: I'm on the road a lot, and I sometimes end up in places where the only choice for food is a McDonald's. What do I order that's filling but doesn't destroy my chance for visible abs this summer?

A: A few years ago I drove cross-country from New York City to Los Angeles. I figured out pretty quickly that unless I wanted to starve, I needed to learn how to use food courts and fast-food restaurants without ruining my physique. It's not easy, but it's doable.

With McDonald's, the best-kept secret is the breakfast burrito. You can also do the scrambled eggs or Egg McMuffin during breakfast hours. (They stop at 10:30 or 11 a.m.). For lunch or dinner, try their Premium Southwest Salad with grilled chicken, or even better, the Premium Caesar Salad with chicken. Or you can go for burgers without buns, plus a side salad.

If you have choices beyond the Fallen Arches, I think you'll do better with Quiznos, Baja Fresh, Chipotle Grill, or Subway. If you're in Southern California, Nevada, or Arizona, you can try Rubio's Fresh Mexican Grill or El Pollo Loco (which is expanding out of the Southwest into places like Illinois and Massachusetts). You'll find lots of grilled chicken, guacamole, and salsa. (Chipotle advertises free-range, no-hormones-added chicken and beef.)

At Subway, you can do the turkey or roast beef and load up with veggies and avocado. Order a six-inch sandwich (never choose the 12-inch option) on a honey-wheat roll. Ask them to pull out the doughy inside of the roll and toss it. Dress with their oil (which is a mix of olive and disgusting canola oil, but still ...).
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby Weib » Sun May 17, 2009 9:29 pm

You'd better believe there's a catch. He'd have to train twice a day, and this is how Poliquin describes the nutrition strategy: "I usually give them 2 grams of protein per pound of body weight per day, and the carbs come from 10 licks of a dried prune."


Underlined with a great AAS stack and a nicely designed PCT to keep their gains.
Working "hard," or the perception of working hard, doesn't really mean anything. Sweating, vomiting, and breathing hard could be a good workout or a tropical disease kicking in.-Dan John
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby aaron » Sun May 17, 2009 10:12 pm

let's guess the stack.

test prop base, plus min water retention and bloating
uh masteron for hardness
EQ for vascularity
clen + t3 as fatburner

hmm.. letro as Aromatose Inhibitor cos its the strongest, uh plus var/winny as orals HAHAHA IF RIGHT GOT PRIZES BO LOLOL.
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby Ryan.carpediem » Mon May 18, 2009 3:25 pm

aaron wrote:let's guess the stack.

test prop base, plus min water retention and bloating
uh masteron for hardness
EQ for vascularity
clen + t3 as fatburner

hmm.. letro as Aromatose Inhibitor cos its the strongest, uh plus var/winny as orals HAHAHA IF RIGHT GOT PRIZES BO LOLOL.


Aaron, are you trying to say that most of poliquin's athletes can perform at that level because of the drugs, rather than his supplements, training, nutrtion?

Weib wrote:
You'd better believe there's a catch. He'd have to train twice a day, and this is how Poliquin describes the nutrition strategy: "I usually give them 2 grams of protein per pound of body weight per day, and the carbs come from 10 licks of a dried prune."


Underlined with a great AAS stack and a nicely designed PCT to keep their gains.


What's PCT man?
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby galapogos » Mon May 18, 2009 3:40 pm

Ryan.carpediem wrote:What's PCT man?

Puah Chut Teng...
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby Sufian » Mon May 18, 2009 8:24 pm

dont overanalyse.

Dont make presumptions.

Dont assume that just because someone is huge, he is on roids.
I have frens on roids who are not huge.

Give people the credit for the effort they put in training. The hard work, which we dont see, is most often overlooked.
If taking roids would instantly make u big, huge and ripped, there will be lots of those in all the gyms in Singapore.
"the more u sweat in training, the less u bleed in battle"
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby Derek » Mon May 18, 2009 9:20 pm

Weib wrote:
You'd better believe there's a catch. He'd have to train twice a day, and this is how Poliquin describes the nutrition strategy: "I usually give them 2 grams of protein per pound of body weight per day, and the carbs come from 10 licks of a dried prune."


Underlined with a great AAS stack and a nicely designed PCT to keep their gains.


Seriously?
Work Smart, Work Hard, and Kick Ass.

Skinny twig... Time to bulk up!
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby aaron » Mon May 18, 2009 10:30 pm

fuck you ryan lol i just posted that in response to what louis wrote okay. why didnt you say 'louis, are you suggesting poliquin blah blah blah' lol wtf.
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby Ryan.carpediem » Mon May 18, 2009 11:00 pm

aaron wrote:fuck you ryan lol i just posted that in response to what louis wrote okay. why didnt you say 'louis, are you suggesting poliquin blah blah blah' lol wtf.


no thanks. i've had a discussion with him in person on this topic and I just wanted to hear your imput.
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Re: Question of nutrition vol 1-6 by johnny bowden

Postby Weib » Mon May 18, 2009 11:18 pm

I know why, poliquin has the midas touch.
It must be the ART + Taijutsu that causes the body to recompose fat into muscles within 8 weeks by opening the 8 chakra gates, one gate per week.

Oh wait, wrong number.. thats paul chek. :lol:
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